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clark oposian, whose group put on the education, and dennis vac rockle p what are teachers telling you? >> they've had an emipiphany of sorts. the only training so far has lock the doors and hide behind the desk. we need to give them another option. we had about 200 teachers, other school employees as well. >> you've down this a long time. what percentage after the training end up getting guns. >> some of them already have firearms. i don't know, but the majority of those that i still communicate with, they have their firearms and carrying in schools. >> listen to one teacher that went through the training. >> now, especially, i'm thinking this would be a great opportunity to probably the children, protect the classroom and the teachers if that opportunity arose. that's the reason i'm here. >> what's the reaction to that. they fair carrying concealed weapons inside schools. >> well, as a high school math teacher for 23 years, i can tell you that guns do not belong in schools, period. i believe this is a complex problem action and to suggest there is one solution, to put more guns in sc
with the organization. >> what are you going to be doing with them? >>i will go with them on educational program. i've been on one before and they do wonderful work and i'm delighted they asked me to be a part of it. >> are you staying here in washington? >> no, of course not. i'm going home to california. you can do everything, you know, remotely now. there is no reason to put yourself in one place that you don't -- that you are leaving anyway. i will back b back in california. >> what are you going miss most about congress? >> it took me a while to realize that i would miss anything. i'm a person when the timing is right, i know i'm doing the right thing, but i'm going to miss my friendships. i'm going miss the excitement. this is an exciting place. i'm used to a lot of activity in my life. if i'm smart at all, i'm going to learn how to sit down, take things in, and not always be on the move. >> who are some of your best friends here in congress? >> without blinking my best friend is barbara lee and maxine waters. others like betty mccolumn, when we go to dinner everyone gets nervous that somethi
, compelling educational benefits for them. that's it. s it is a what -- that is what the university of texas is arguing. that is the exception to the principle of nondiscrimination that the supreme court has recognized. okay? now, i think that's ridiculous. and, indeed, you know, the reason the court, you know, buys this is because there are social scientists out there who say, no, it's true, it's true. it really happened. now, increasingly these educational benefits -- which, you know, make only marginal improvements to education, you know, at best, are disputed. you know, it is increasingly disputed that there are any eggal benefits. -- educational benefits. but i think it's also important for the court to bear in mind, and i think the court's jurisprudence is leaning this way, that even if there are some educational went fits -- benefits, they've got to be weighed against the costs that are inherent in engaging in this discrimination, right? i mean, something as compelling, something, if an interest is compelling, you've got to consider the inherent liabilities in the racial discriminatio
by this incredible will that he had and nursed for education. -- thirst for education. he was embarrassed to did not finish college, so he finished law school instead. he went on and on. the idea of senator byrd as majority leader of the senate is quite remarkable. he came into the senate with the great class of 1958. they set the foundation for what i call the great senate that came later, the progressive senate. it was a democratic landslide that your. -- year. he was undeniably the most conservative of senators elected. whole flood of liberal senators and then there was robert byrd. it was not his youthful membership that was the issue. in later years, he remained against civil rights, which was essential thing the senate was about in the 1960s. he opposes civil rights act in 19641965. he opposed martial -- in 1964 and 1965. he oppose richard nixon toyed with putting him on the supreme court just to show the senate what he could do. senator byrd moderated his views all the time. he got lucky. issues that result on civil rights -- you got resolved on civil rights. senator byrd that's on the le
question, lots of answers. about 200 educators in utah are mulling that over today after attending classes on firearm use and safety. the course of geared toward teachers. instructors are not trying to persuade teachers to carry guns in schools, but to provide the information and training they need in the wake of the newtown massacre. the classes have been going on for some time and some teachers are sold on the idea of arming themselves. others simply want to explore their options. >> i think it's important to have protection because if you don't have it, i feel like we're sitting ducks. >> we're going to help them understand where their moral code and value system really is. until they discover that, they are not prepared to carry a firearm. >> utah already allows teachers to carry concealed weapons in schools. >>> for the second time this month, a man has been shoved to his death from a subway platform in new york city. it happened last night in queens. police and witnesses say a woman who had been pacing and mumbling pushed a man in front of the number 7 train before running down two f
tax cuts for people under $250,000. but it will include the education tax credit and the child tax credit and the earned income tax credit. these are refundable tax credits that affect mostly low-income people. so that will be on the table. but, you know, the republicans, the disdain that i have seen for poor people, from people who are struggling, like senior citizens on medicare and social security, for low-income people and the women, infant, and children program, we saw the republicans last week vote to spending cuts that would literally take food out of the mouths of hungry babies and in this country, you want to talk about crisis, fiscal crisis, et cetera, a crisis is that one out of five american children is hungry at some point during the year. that is just immoral. and they voted to even cut that. and so i agree with you. i think we have to talk about the consequences for real people. middle class, and as the president said tonight, those who aspire to the middle class. and that would include the unemployed right now, and we're going to extend unemployment insurance benefi
institutions or any other educator at any level. it is more conducive working hand in hand with communities and that is where i stand in coming here today. >> congressmen elijah cummings said the board's decision was a done deal and said he was looking forward to a more diplomatic process where the public could have a say. >> i think we have a great board. 15 very dedicated people trying to make the right decision. we will hear from dr. wilson and make the best decision in the interest of the university. >> we have some good news tonight for the ports up and down the east coast in the retailers to depend on them. the possible strike that could a crippled the cargo economy will not happen for at least another 30 days. 11 news has been keeping an eye on the negotiations. federal mediators say that the union has agreed to extend their contract until at least midnight january 28th. the work stoppage would have idled shipments of a huge range of consumer products from electronics to clothing. now to the fiscal cliff hanger. three more days and then tax hikes on everyone, automatic spending cuts,
school has to have a teacher with a gun. i don't think teachers go to get their education to do that. they want -- that's why you need to have separate resource officers and armed guards to have that protection. >> let me ask you one final question, and that is, where does this end? let's say, fine, people want to put armed professionals inside schools to protect children. there was a movie theater shot up in aurora and a shopping mall that was shot up in tucson. where does it end? can you arm every place that a gunman might go? put ex-police officers, whatever? it seems it's never ending. >> you're right. i mean, it's a problem we have in our society, and, you know, movie theaters actually are making those decisions. many of them have retired police officers, off-duty police officers, malls have the same thing. so should we say we're not going to have the same type of protection when our children are going to school? certainly there's going to be some schools and some parts of the society that say we don't want do that investment, we will take the risk. but let's look simply at the
him to take on this mission, he had already had sort of a graduate level education if you will in howards are fought in the desert and that separated him in many ways from his four star contemporaries who were mainly back in those days focused on fighting the war in europe. >> harris: for people just joining us, general norman schwarzkopf has died. he led operation desert shield and desert storm which were the largest deployments of u.s. forces and equipment since the vietnam war and general scales you just mentioned president george h.w. bush is ailing in the hospital but we have just gotten a statement from the former president and i want to share it with our viewers if you are still with us. the former president says "barbara and i mourn the loss of a true american patriot and one of the great mill tare leaders of our generation. hailing from westpoint. general norman schwarzkopf to me epitomized the service the dallesty creed that served our great nation through this trying natural crises. a good and decent man and a good friend. barbara and i send our condolences to h
. let's remember now, we have seen this year education budgets cut. we don't have money to give teachers raises. we had a teachers strike in chicago. we don't have money to do things that teachers need, but we'll find money to arm them, to train them, to buy them guns, ammunition. what are we saying? so we can arm teachers, but we can't give teachers money to give them the ability to be better educators? to me that's the wrong message to send. >> two sides are looking for meaningful contributions. the fact there was a gun buy-back program, the day after christmas, 1500 rifles and handguns were taken back by police in exchange for groceries and a cash back program there in los angeles. hugely successful. meanwhile, arizona's attorney general is proposes a voluntary programs where schools would arm at least one staff member. meanwhile, there's a gun group in utah offers a free concealed weapons course to public schoolteachers today. as we look for federal solution for this, and answers from our elected leaders, is it really the onus being on the local school districts right now to protect
education, all that stuff. they don't care about that. they spend the money on what they want to get elected. >> when you're saying that the previous mayor spent all the money, you're talking about mayor daly. rahm emanuel is in place now. >> right. >> he spent all the money on what? and then, two, what is the realistic proposal here to reverse the violence? >> well, over 20 years i can give you a laundry list of corruption and cronyism. but you know it well because you were here as well. and you saw it. there was a reporter once for "time" doing a cnn profile, comparing richard daly to andy of maybury and said he presides over chicago like andy of maybury. now that reporter is the press secretary for president obama. so there had been -- not you, obviously, but there had been people who were papering over and smooching up and making things look nice when they weren't nice. the city is broke. we're a thousand police officers down, at least, right? and now the city is creating this news flap, public relations issue, saying there is now we're going to take one off the 500 and make it 499. you'
educators feel about giving teachers firearms training? bob hinky is a principal at mountain crest high school. how do you feel about this? >> well, i think the teachers have that right and so i feel like it's okay, but i have some things i'm very concerned about. i personally wouldn't carry a gun or get a concealed weapon myself. the concerns i have is the concealed weapons, i have a friend who just received his a couple of years ago and through the training, they never used a gun and had a gun in the class. i worry about the training that they have to actually fire the firearm and to use it. without endangering others as well. so there things i'm concerned about, having a concealed weapon on campus of course is -- we have strict policies that relate to that to ensure everyone is safe and a teacher if they violated that policy because they don't want to put others at risk either. >> what about having the weapon in school and having a kid possibly have access to it. that opens the door for accidents. >> absolutely. that's one of the concerns. so our policy is that it has to be concealed
and neither highly educate and both of them made a very good living, but as a twist, when we look at labor, we have to look at how inclusive the labor unions are, and how much they advocate for people across race and gender, and we have to look at the strategy of labor unions in terms of is it about broadening the numbers of people who are participating in unios s or it is about protecting the interest of the feem who already have union membership? that is a critical case where when you talk about expanding the role of unions, you have to also talk about expanding the ranks of unions, because that is sometimes going to cut against the grain of cheollective bargaining rank for existing members, so without overcomplicating the things, we have to be aware that the overall percentage of american workers who have been unionized is slhrinking in part because o the destabilization of the market that is not educated. >> and the role of the union is a way to go broad and deep. and lord knows that the best paying jobs have nothing to do with having a ph.d. and stay right, there because we want to stay i
in the country, is opposed to this. teachers don't go to school and learn how to educate little children so they can become sharpshooters. and they don't want to go to a workplace where they're in danger of being mowed down. we need to do something to actually protect schools from being shootout zones. and this proposal is just not serious. and it's too bad because i remember actually, professor dyson, when you yourself said let's give the nra a chance because this was this terrible shocked silence after this tragedy, where the whole country was grief-stricken and thinking what's the plan? what are we going to do? because we can't live this way. and so they come back and this is the plan? this is ridiculous. >> yeah, more than ridiculous, to be sure. so a teacher in oregon made an interesting point in support of arming faculty. here's what she said about getting a gun. >> i don't think guns in a school system will ever be very palatable. i also think that we need to give teachers an opportunity to buy some time. whether that's with, you know, district-issued pepper spray, maybe a taser, som
part-time or summer hire. we never did get into the education thing at all. we are focused on doing a job. my point on education is that there is something revolutionary that needs to happen. if you look now in the internet age and realize the rate at which a student downloads information -- the people who are really smart are bored. i think within maybe 20-25 years, you won't see a classroom typically like we do, where you see everybody goes to a classroom. it is for that reason, it is not a good thing to teach people who are going to be innovators later on. next question. >> thank you very much for your talk. what skills, academic, etc., do you need at early ages to facilitate creativity and innovation? how can parents and schools shape these attributes for kids? >> in answering that, i am going to focus on word that you said. you said cultivate. the point i have tried to make is that if things are going around in the world outside of the kid's community, outside of his local interface and outside of his school, if he sees wonderful progress happen, that is so different -- that is
medicare, children's programs, education, infrastructure, and it threatens our economy as a whole. does anyone really believe there is not a single dollar to be saved anywhere in the pentagon? the american people have spoken. they have made it loud and clear they want a balanced approach that casts the wealthiest americans to pay a little bit more. it protect our seniors, children, and our most vulnerable neighbors. the republican leaders refuse to listen. let me say another thing. i would say my republican freshman colleague -- i remember the promises of things you said would change. i would say, you own this now. you have officially become part of the problem, if not the problem. it is a vote against accountability. let me say this, my republican friends have made it on fashionable to worry about the poor and the elderly and the vulnerable. i urge my colleagues not to turn your backs on the most needy. let's balance our budget in a way that does not lower the quality of life or decrease the standard of living. we can do so much better. instead of doing this, you should be negotiating
. gregg: what do you think? >> i think i want to go after the whole legal educational complex. as a legal employer myself i can tell you that my heart goes out to anyone graduating law school right now. mr. sullivan wants to say that they are providing you a legal education, a socratic-type experience, that's fine. put that on the brochure. have it in big letters when you get the nice gloss see brochure and say look, we are not here providing you with the skills you need to actually pay back this $250,000 in debt we'll saddle you werement we are providing you with an educational experience and let the cards fall where they may. it's absolutely an ethical problem. to realize how wrong this is look at what goes on in medical schools. you don't see thousands of medical students graduating medical school with no prospect of employment. if the medical schools can calibrate the number of admission slots to the need for doctors why can't the a ba do the exact same thing. gregg: i did teach a law school class and what they represented to their students, and truth there is no resemblance. >> the d
that are on the top are states that educate their young people, states that have taken the issue of obesity and exercise very seriously. the states on the bottom tend to be poorer states but that is not mutually exclusive because you have states like oklahoma and alabama, who have actually moved up in the rankings. so the issue is one of education. accessibility to the better foods, supermarkets coming into neighborhoods. for instance, in certain neighborhoods, there's really a lack of green groceries and mrs. obama has shed a lot of light on that subject, to our credit. and i think that was we go along and we come to understand these are very expensive issues, i mean, obesity costs us $190 billion a year. that is an incredible amount of money, and the other way to look at it is, we use about 1.1 billion gallons, extra of gas lane, owing to obesity. 1% of the gasoline we use is related to obesity. >> heather: it is just not mon taylor, that it is costing. it also costs us in lost time and also lost productivity. >> exactly. but the real problem with obesity is childhood obesity. and we have
educating them. with that said, i'm concerned about investors in general not really understanding what they have, and if interest rates go up, even a small amount, there could be negative rates of returns on securities or funds and how will they react, particularly in an environment where there's a potential for less liquidity. dagen: washington, as they have in the past, pardon the language, screws things up, though, then the fed a likely to stay accommodative; right? in the coming year, do you think? >> they absolutely are. i think it's probably, at least near term, the right policy. my concern is if inflation unexpectedly rises for some reason, will they be quick enough to pull away all the enormous liquidity in the market place? they feel they can, but we have seen instances before in the past 20-30 # years where that's not been the case, and it's going to be pretty hard to figure out so, to me, that's one of the bigger, longer term issues not to come into play, at least through much of 2013. dagen: bob, really quickly, what do you like owning right now? what helps you sleep? what
was astonishing. he was driven primarily by this incredible will that he had and thirst for education. he was embarrassed to did not finish college, so he finished law school instead. he went on and on. the idea of senator byrd as majority leader of the senate is quite remarkable. he came into the senate with the great class of 1958. they set the foundation for what i call the great senate that came later, the progressive senate. it was a democratic landslide that year. he was undeniably the most conservative of senators elected. philip hart, a whole -- whole flood of liberal senators and then there was robert byrd. it was not his youthful membership that was the issue. in later years, he remained against civil rights, which was essential thing the senate was about in the 1960s. he opposes civil rights act in 1964 and 1965. he opposed thurgood marshall when he was nominated. senator byrd was so conservative on some of these issues that in 1971,richard nixon toyed with putting him on the supreme court just to show the senate what he could do. senator byrd moderated his views all the time.
as history. just educational to americans. >> well, it's fascinating, isn't it? it's like an epic inside baseball movie because it doesn't take the piece of lincoln's life that we're most familiar with. instead, the civil war is almost done. and here is a man who is weighing how to translate this horrible, horrible war and the emancipation proclamation, freeing the slaves and how to turn it into policy, government policy, to say that all things are equal under the law. so you watch this movie and it makes you think lincoln wasn't just some guy who sat on a pedestal. he was a guy out there playing hardball. he had these three lobbyists in the film. i wish we could take -- >> no, they were on the fiscal cliff. >> the fiscal cliff guys and it says -- >> no, they're the best lobbyists i've seen. it showed that the democratic party of that day were pretty were copperheads. they were playing ball with the war ending saying that they could let the south keep slavery. >> right. and you know everything didn't really change until the so-called southern strategy. i had to keep doing back flips in m
of support for arming educators. i want to throw up the gallup poll. 64% of americans agree with you. arming one school official would be effective. a poll taken shows 54% of americans view the the national rifle association in a favorable light. so the idea of putting some fire power in schools seems to be gaining traction, but my question to you is why stop there? why not focus on some additional gun control, as well, perhaps extending waiting periods and limiting ammunition and a ban on semiautomatics. can you see those in addition to arming teachers, as well? >> if i thought that banning a specific type of firearm would help, i would be all for it, but i know for a fact, it doesn't. they have strict gun control laws in connecticut. here in utah, we've been doing this for 12 years and this is nothing new and we have one of the most permissive states for firearms and we haven't had school shootings either. >> you mentioned the ban on specific types of guns. what about banning certain types of ammunition? what about limiting certain types of ammunition, can you see the need in that? no, it'
. rallying. educating and registering people to vote across the country on election day. these were the striking pictures. lines as long as seven hours. but voters made sure to have their voices heard. the resolve of the american people determined the direction we wanted this nation to go. not everyone had an easy time accepting the news though. >> do you believe that ohio has been settled? >> no, i don't. >> so you're not saying that obama isn't going to win. >> i think this is premature. we've got a quarter of the vote. >> we won't forget carl roves epic on-air melt down. i guess that's what happens when you blow $300 million trying to winn win an election. the republicans money machine, 2012 was simply the year the rich couldn't buy. and it was a year full of wins, none bigger than this. >> the bottom line here is the supreme court has upheld the health care case. >> well, we have a health care law in tact. >> obama care unheld. a day to remember. and on issue after issue, progressives fought back. after 32 straight defeats at the ballot box, marriage equality won in reign. won i
the code, freeing up money to invest in things like education. nobody's talking about that anymore. you know, right now they're really struggling to figure out what to do with the tax cuts. and, you know, they're not even talking about the sequester very much anymore, which would -- you know, the tax cuts, they would hurt immediately. and everybody's taxes are going up next year if you're a wage earner one way or another because of the payroll tax holiday expiring. but there's a whole host of issues and they're not going to be able to deal with all of them. it's become very immediate and it looks like the small deal is going to leetch whole bunch of things for them to do next year. >> good point. we'll get to this more later in the show. the taxes are where all the political heat is, but the discussion is actually about the more important things, all of those cut, the structure of our government. we'll discuss this more, annie. steven mentioned his name. coming up, this man may be the most feared man in washington. >> if i went and became a tibetan monk on the top of some mountain somew
, infrastructure, we've got education. >> it's a big list. >> it's time this government acts together, and if we can't get together on this, we are in trouble all the way. >> all right. my governors, thanks very much and have a really happy new year. >> thanks, karen. >>> coming up, it's not just the fiscal cliff. the president has a lot to do and not a lot of time to do it. stay with us. >> the president goes off 18 hours on the golf course, 20 hours in the air. how do you view this politically? >> he's been using this, and i must say with great skill and ruthless skill and success to fracture and basically shatter the republican opposition. we're all having such a great year in the gulf, we've decided to put aside our rivalry. 'cause all our states are great. and now is when the gulf gets even better. the beaches and waters couldn't be more beautiful. take a boat ride or just lay in the sun. enjoy the wildlife and natural beauty. and don't forget our amazing seafood. so come to the gulf, you'll have a great time. especially in alabama. you mean mississippi. that's florida. say louisiana or the
, by thinking about where want your education to lead, while you're still in school, you might find the best route... leads somewhere you weren't even looking. let's get to work. >>> they are deadly weapons of war no one expects to see on the streets of an american city so you can imagine the shock when a gun buyback program in los angeles yielded rocket-propelled grenade launchers. kyung lah, what are you finding out about this story? >> police are saying it's certainly stunning but they are not surprised. this is something that they deal with every day. weapons on the streets of los angeles, certainly very rare that they come across something like this but they are hoping that by showing it it gives americans some pause and perspective. a rocket launcher. not just one but two handed over to police in this week's gun buyback day. shocking? not to police who have seen it before. among the roughly 10,000 citizens since 2009. >> we look like we're in a third world war nation when you see all of these weapons and the question you have to ask is why? >> these were u.s.-made and owned privately a
deserve but have a right to an education. >> i will get my education if it is in home, school or any place. >> the taliban retaliated hunting her down, shooting her in the neck and back. the attack outraged even hardened pakistanis and all around the world, malala quickly became an international symbol of good against evil. today, she is recovering in england. >>> number one, president barack obam obama. >> tonight, you voted for action. not politics as usual. >> after a long and we mean long and bitter campaign, president obama won re-election 2340g 12, the president also won the supreme court's stamp of approval for his health care reform program and made history with this statement. >> i think same-sex couples should be able to get married. ♪ >> as 201 comes to a close, the president joined in grief with a community shocked by senseless violence. >> these tragedies must end. and to end them, we must change. >> brooke baldwin, cnn, atlanta. >> another ironman, another anchor man, another star trek, so many sequels to look forward to in 2013. our movie critic tells us which ones she is
after she was assassinated. he spoke at a rally with his father. the president said his son's education is finished and his training has begun. two-time prime minister benazir bhutto was killed at a campaign rally in 2007. >>> and it's not all doom and gloom for the u.s. economy. home sales moved at the fastest pace in more than two years. sales rose more than 4.5%. sale were in-flighted by a temporary tax credit for home buyers. and investing more than $773 million in the manufacturing plants in michigan, the. says it will update and he can pand production lines at six plants in the state and creating more than 2,000 hourly jobs. it's all part of a deal that ford made to invest more than $6 billion in u.s. plants by the year 2015. >>> and a mother who hoped to spend christmas with her husband and two children turned to the online community for help. she was facing mountain bills and a major surgery. our affiliate wftx has her story. >> in this four-minute youtube video, jennifer johnson doesn't say a word but yet says so much as she tells the story of her heart condition that would kil
the congressional hearings and the stuff about the educational stuff, all the policy-making situations. thatnk it's a great thing washington d.c. has all these things and c-span covers it. >> eric want to c-span on comcast. created by america's cable companies in 1979, run to you as a public-service by your television provider. >> "washington journal" continues. host: randal o'toole is a senior fellow at the cato institute in washington and is the author of this book on how government undermines the dream of home ownership. thanks for being with us. >> good morning. glad to be here. host: how does the government affect homeowners buying a home? guest: 45% of american housing is in states and urban areas that have severe land-use restrictions, urban growth boundaries to prevent urban sprawl. they have other kinds of restrictions such as onerous permitting processes that it takes up to five years to get a permit to build up to one house. that makes it very hard for builders to meet demand for housing. when that happens, housing prices become very expensive. homeownership rates dropped. the federal
will go with them on educational program. i've been on one before and they do wonderful work and i'm delighted they asked me to be a part of it. >> are you staying here in washington? >> no, of course not. i'm going home to california. you can do everything, you know, remotely now. there is no reason to put yourself in one place that you don't -- that you are leaving anyway. i will back b back in california. >> what are you going miss most about congress? >> it took me a while to realize that i would miss anything. i'm a person when the timing is right, i know i'm doing the right thing, but i'm going to miss my friendships. i'm going miss the excitement. this is an exciting place. i'm used to a lot of activity in my life. if i'm smart at all, i'm going to learn how to sit down, take things in, and not always be on the move. >> who are some of your best friends here in congress? >> without blinking my best friend is barbara lee and maxine waters. others like betty mccollum, when we go to dinner everyone gets nervous that something is up and they are usually right. sometimes we go fo
the quality of education against the economic value. top honors go to the university of carolina at chapel hill, which held the top spot since the list came out in 1998. it's followed by the university of virginia, florida, college of william and mary and university of maryland college park. it's all based on the availability of financial aid. >>> stay with us. there's much more ahead on 11 news saturday morning. first here's a look at some events going on around town. >>> the holiday season is still in full swing. if you're looking for ways to stay in that christmas spirit there's one place to spread some cheer. one man's home has become an annual exhibit for the entire community. the lights may truly encompass the meaning of the season. ♪ jingle bell, jingle bell rock ♪ >> the rights are exquisite. 45,000 of them. they've been blinking in unison since november 27th, complete with holiday carols, a star of david and several christmas trees. glenn zire spent 50 hours putting together his home for the season. while neighbors and visitors have been looking forward to the display for year
. >> that is educational. >> zarf, quickly. >> it's this. >>> all right. jonathan is an 11-year-old drummer, enjoys exploring the p p percussive sounds of household appliances. check this out. okay. so he's 10 years old when he posted the video in september. he's taken drum lessons but says he's basically self-taught. he thinks the washing machine is easier to play than his own drum kit. sounds like a college marching band. he's really good. >> you want to demo? who's really good at percussion? you play the guitar. >> i've done enough in this segment to embarrass myself. i think we should do phil collins "in the air tonight" drum solo. >> while they do that, i'm going to tell you that up next we've got five ways to actually keep your new year's resolution in 2013 right after this. this family used capital one venture miles to come home for the holidays. that's double miles you can actually use... sadly, their brother's white christmas just got "blacked out." [ brother ] but it's the family party! really jingles your bells, doesn't it? my gift to you! the capital one venture card! for any flight, an
amendment, advocating the right to keep and bear arms, advancing gun safety, education, and training and creating an answer to freedom's call and we are growing stronger every day. we are the nra and the and are a. nra. host: those of the words of senator joe manchin who is a gun advocate. we're taking your calls and comments -- will it be a bitter fight ahead? we go to the democrats' line from macon, georgia. caller: how many children are we going to lose to guns before something is done? i remember during the 08 election, there were people around the president of the united states with assault rifles. we put people in schools with the guns, what happens if there in the restroom and somebody breaks and from the front? how are they going to protect the children? how many children do we have to lose? host: thanks for the call -- let me share with you this photograph from "the new york daily news." a handful of students tried to flee and lanza shot teem. some of the other fallen students are in the photograph. because of the teacher process protection, most of her students survived a c
on friday at 5:30 p.m. eastern. if you want more education about currencies, go to currency class at money in motion.cnbc.com. >> an article in today's "new york times" finds once traditional dating priorities like having a good job, physical chemistry, may not matter if your credit score is less than attractive. the "times" interviewed more than 50 daters all around the u.s. they were all under 40 years old. brings us to this morning's squawk on the tweet. what's the most important financial question to ask on a first date. tweet us @squawk street. are we getting any responses? >> i don't know. can you imagine opening up that conversation? so, what's your credit score? are you using experian or transunion? >> i would expect you to do that on a date. >> what? why would you select me? i feel like that's not a compliment. >> this is a question you ask when you're over 40. the responders in that were all under 40. >> that's true. more to do with maybe a nest egg, so to speak, right? >> you can be more reckless. >> oh, yeah. >> london, here we come. >> retailers feeling the effect of slow holi
, and research laboratories, educational situations, they're looking all over the country at what a sort of mindless 10% cut means or whatever. so they are really at the point of wanting some spes if ity and having someone look at, should we do this program or that program? and that's really what the congressman's going to have to do. >> yeah. i just -- i wonder how that shifts things now? because the narrative right now, and maybe the public will buy it right now, is that the republicans have been obstructionist about the tax issue. once we get past january 1st and you get everything you want, you won't even have to argue about $400,000, $500,000, $1 million. i don't know really if the president has had any reason to negotiate in good faith. >> he knew we were going over -- he knew he could get back to 39.6, and you saw geithner. in fact, congressman, i think we should have learned from this. check out this quick sound bite. >> is the administration prepared to go over the fiscal cliff? >> oh, absolutely. again, there's no prospect to an agreement that doesn't involve those rates going
hearing the screaming and shooting over the school's loud speakers. it also says the board of education failed to provide a safe school setting or emergency response plan. in all, 26 people, including 20 children were shot and killed by gunman adam lanza that day. russia playing politics. putting their kids at risk. their orphans at risk. president vladimir putin has banned americans from adopting russian children. the move reportedly is in response to human rights violations handed down by president obama earlier this year -- earlier this month rather. putin's new law destroying the dreams of many american families currently in the process of adopting, including this. >> they were already our family. we already had their names. we were already decorating their room. it's really. [crying] >> are you crying? it? >> is so disturbing, this story. 1,000 russian children were adopted by americans last year. children are disabled. not wanted by anybody else in russia. living in orphanages. not available for adoption. a the love these families have gotten really close to the adoption. set ever
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